The way that we perceive the world is constantly being challenged and altered because of our subjective views of the texts that we read

The way that we perceive the world is constantly being challenged and altered because of our subjective views of the texts that we read, particularly through distinctively visual techniques. John Misto’s play ‘The Shoe-Horn Sonata’ (1996) and Kenneth Slessor’s ‘William Street’ (1983) explores distinct visuals of hope, survival, injustice, brutality, horror and friendship. Our perception of these issues is shaped by distinctively visual techniques such as visual and aural imagery, stage directions, parodied humor, camera angles and lighting.

These texts effectively uses distinctive visuals to convey distinctive experiences thus changing the way we perceive the world. Our perception on issues of injustice, hope, survival and mateship is shaped by distinctively visual techniques such as visual and aural imagery, stage directions, parodied humour, camera angles and lighting.