What I Learned from the Fire essays

Experiencing a house fire changes what you value in life and it shows you what is truly important.
?As the bell rang Friday, August 31st, (Labor Day weekend) I thought it was going to be the best weekend of my entire life. My grandparents from Florida came for a visit and I had so many plans with my friends. It got ever better when I realized I had no homework. That night my family and I went out to eat at Parason’s which is really rare for us because we never go out to eat. I remember being so anxious at dinner because Laura and I were going to have a sleepover. Once dinner was over my parents finally dropped me off at Laura’s. I remember telling Laura how much I hated my parents and that they ruin everything. I also remember complaining about things like I didn’t have enough clothes. I only looked at the things I didn’t have instead of being grateful for what I did have.
?The next day my dad came to pick me up early in the morning and we went shopping all day. Saturday night my mom went over to my grandparent's hotel to spend some time with them, while my dad and I stayed home and watched a movie. My mom came home long after my dad and I had fallen asleep. She always parks her car in the garage and of course shuts the garage door after she parked.My dog and two cats are outside pets and they stay in the garage at night.
At 4:15 on Sunday morning, I awoke to my mom barging in my room and pulling up my blinds to see what was going on outside. She woke up because she thought she heard gun shots going off at our house, but what we saw was huge orange flames. We both panicked. You think "my house will never burn down" or if it did, you would grab some of your most treasured items. But let me tell you, when it is happening to you all you are thinking about is getting out of there. I didn’t even have enough time to grab my glasses. My mom seemed to be really calm and I could never understand why. My dad thought she wa…

Theories of Cognitive Development essays

Part I: Introduce Piaget and Vygotsky
Jean Piaget (1896-1980): Piaget was thefirst psychologist who made a systematic study of cognitive development (McLeod, Saul, 2009). He was fascinated with why children gave incorrect answers on questions that would require only logical thinking. Piaget demonstrated that children think in much different ways than adults. He believed that cognitive development proceeds through four stages: (1) the sensorimotor stage; (2) the preoperational stage; (3) the concrete operations stage; and (4) the formal operations stage (Cognitive Development). Piaget's contributions include a theory of cognitive child development, detailed observational studies of cognition in children and series of simple test to reveal different cognitive abilities (McLeod, Saul, 2009).
Lev Vygotsky (1896-1934): Vygotsky's theory stresses the fundamental role of social interaction in the development of cognition (McLeod, Saul, 2007). He strongly believed that community plays the primary factor in the process of "making meaning". His work on cognitive development has become the foundation became the foundation of what has become known as Social Development Theory (McLeod, Saul, 2007).
Part II: Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development
Piaget's created what he called a semi-clinical interview that used both psychological and clinical methods. He would begin with asking the children standardized questions and depending on how they answered he would ask them a series of nonstandard questions. Piaget was looking for what he called "spontaneous conviction" so he often asked questions that children neither expected nor anticipated (Jean Piaget). In his studies he noticed there was a gradual progression of intuitive and scientific to social acceptable responses. Piaget theorized that children did this because of social interaction (Jean Piaget).
In Piaget's view, cognitive developmen…

Fred Uhlman’s Reunion essays

;The weak individual is intimidated by the political movements of his age; the strong individual rises above political movements and remains true to himself.; How is this shown to be the case in Fred Uhlman;s Reunion?
;It is always more difficult to fight against faith than against knowledge.; This quote by Hitler demonstrates how people that stay true to themselves and their beliefs are a lot harder to deceive then those who just rely on knowledge. Han;s Father is a great example of a strong individual who is not easily fooled. In comparison a good example of a weak individual would be Konradin who is very much intimidated by the Nazi Party and their views.
Han;s father is one character in this book that was never intimidated by the political movements as he had fought for Germany in WW1 and felt he had earned his place in society. When the Zionist came to collect money for Israel, Han;s Father became outraged and explained ;I should favor the complete absorption of Jews by the Germans if I could be convinced it would be of lasting profit to Germany.; Han;s Father demonstrates that he is staying true to what he believes in which is his Country.
Konradin is an example of a weak individual, which is apprehensive to the Nazi Party. Even though Hans is his best friend, when it comes to exposing his friendship to the rest of society, especially his parents he is very hesitant, as they despise Jews. ;I didn’t dare talk to you… I didn’t want to hurt you… you have no right to reapproach me,; when Konradin says this it just that he is afraid of what would happen if he showed he was friends with a Jew.Even though a best friend is someone you should be happy to show-off, Konradin isn;t, showing that he is afraid of the current political situation.
In contrast Han;s father when in the presence of Konradin changed into a ;caricature of his true self…

The Soliloquies in Hamlet essays

In his preface, Alex Newell tells us that since publishing a ‘well received essay on “The Dramatic Context and Meaning of Hamlet’s ‘To be or not to be’ Soliloquy”‘ (PMLA 80, March 1965), he has ‘traveled a good deal in Hamlet’. Whereas most middle-aged Shakespearean’s will have found that their journeys in Hamlet have taken them to the fringes, if not through the centres, of a range of contemporary theoretical ‘isms’, Newell’s book reveals that he has remained true to his vision of the 1960’s.
The Soliloquies in ‘Hamlet’: The Structural Design looks at the whole of Hamlet, taking the twelve soliloquies in their dramatic contexts as the key to the play’s meaning. The book is divided into six chapters. Thefirst five provide a series of commentaries on the soliloquies. ‘Images of the Mind’ focuses on thefirst three: the major ‘O that this too too sallied flesh’ speech and the more minor ‘My father’s spirit – in arms’ and ‘O all you host of heaven’. In Newell’s view these opening soliloquies establish the frame of reference in which the tragedy, the tainting of Hamlet’s mind, will take place. Caught between Angel and Beast but blessed with the god-given power of reason, Hamlet will eventually succumb to the hellish temptation of revenge – passion and madness overcoming rationality. The centrality of this argument is foregrounded in the titles of the next four chapters. ‘Passion and Reason: A Dramatic Nexus’, centers on the ‘O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I’ soliloquy. In measuring himself against both the revenger Pyrrhus (that ‘Hyrcanian beast’) and the actor who is moved to tears by the passions he is recounting, Hamlet is in danger of succumbing to irrational emotion; in resolving to instigate the ‘mousetrap’, sanity is restored as an ‘essential rationality’ replaces the earlier ‘manic tantrum’. Chapter 3, ‘Discourse of Reason’, centers on ‘To be or not to be’.
Though most commentators have found this soliloquy a distin…

Ten Most Popular Methods of Creative Thinking essays

The main idea is to separate in time the process of ideas generation and their evaluation. Every group member generates ideas, others try to improve them, all ideas are being written in a list, and the analysis of the ideas is being made later. Sometimes can be used so called "mute" version of brainstorming – brainwriting, when all the ideas are being written down on a sheet of paper, which the participants pass to each other and write their newly-arisen thoughts.
You mentally "put on" one of six different hats and think accordingly to the rules of the hat you are carrying. In white hat you impartially analyze numbers and facts. Then you "put on" the black hat and search for everything negative in an idea. After that – yellow hat – search for everything positive. Then – green hat – generate new ideas. When carrying red hat you turn on emotional reactions on the issue. And finally in blue hat you sum everything up.
Author recommends to put the key term in the center of a sheet and then put all possible associations on the branches outgoing from the centre. You may even put pictures behing. While you are drawing the map you may find new associations as well.
Author thinks that the main source of creativity is in the search of analogies. First of all you chose an object and draw the table of its analogies. Infirst column you write direct analogies, in second – indirect analogies (for instance, denial of thefirst column). Then you confront your purpose, object and indirect analogies. Say, for example, your object is a pencil, purpose – diversification. Direct analogy – volumetric pencil, denial – flat pencil. So in the result we receive a pencil-bookmark.
5. Methods of Focal Objects (by Charles Whiting)

Braveheart Movie Review essays

The movie “?Braveheart” won five Academy Awards in 1995 at the 68th Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director. Directed by Mel Gibson, “Braveheart” is about a war for freedom between the Scottish and English. The plot is based on the life of the protagonist, William Wallace, (played by Mel Gibson) who is single-minded and leads the Scottish army to freedom.
“Braveheart” isn't historically accurate. William Wallace never traveled beyond the borders of Scotland. Also, his troops never took control of York as Randall Wallace (scriptwriter) shows in the film. In fact, his troops only arrived to Cumberland and Northumberland that are in Scotland territory. According to history, Malcolm Wallace, father of William Wallace, was alive when he started a rebellion against England in 1297. However, in Gibson's version, he is murdered by the English in the beginning.
The setting of this film is very attractive. While I was watching it, I felt as if I was in the film -it felt so real and I actually became emotional. The directing and producing teams did a good job scouting locations. The setting made the film look real, true to the period and engaging. The cinematography was also well done. Tracking and dolly shots were frequently used in the film, adding drama and an dramatic sweep to the production. I noticed that William Wallace is consistently positioned from a certain angle that makes it look like he’s always in charge. With that in mind, I will never forget the ;close-up shot; of Wallace, taken from a camera positioned over him while he was being punished. It made me feel emotional because for thefirst time in the film, it made Wallace look so vulnerable.
The acting in the film is amazing and all involved did a great job speaking in the Scottish accent, especially considering the fact that the Scottish accent isn’t easy to master. The acting was so effective, it seemed like I was actually watc…

The Infortunate – Indentured Servitude essays

Indentured servitude commenced in the seventeenth century when many Europeans wanted to embark on a life in the colonies. At that time, European nations heavily promoted the possibility of prosperity in the colonies, encouraging families to move to America. However, individuals seeking out affluence in the colonies could not afford the trip to America, and if they could, most would not have enough money to purchase land and support their family. This financial burden did not hinder the European’s longing to reach the colonies. And the solution to the financial problem was indentured servitude.
The complications of seeking out a new life in the colonies is exemplified in ;The Infortunate; an autobiography written by William Moraley that illustrates his voyage as a poor European seeking out prosperity in the colonies as an indentured servant. Although many Europeans hoped to thrive in the colonies, this was not attained withoutdifficulty. Indentured servants and bound servants had a poor quality of life. Indentured servants, even after gaining their freedom usually worked low paying jobs and poor free workers faced similar hardships. Bound servants had an addeddifficulty in that they could be captured and recirculated into slavery all over again. There was no break to the servant-hood cycle.
After the death of his father, a journeyman clockmaker, Moraley possessed scarce resources and was imprisoned for debt. The thirty-year-old Moraley bound himself for five years as a servant in the British North American colonies. As exemplified throughout Moraley;s excursion, a European;s trip to America would be paid for if they would then be a servant for a certain number of years (usually between four and fourteen). After they served their term, an indentured servant would be given clothes, land, and some money. For many poor, taking a ship to the plantations was a form of survival migration, necessitated by the dif…

Jane Eyre Film Study essays

It is common for either very well written books or those made popular by the general public to be made into movies. Most people who are avid readers make a point of reading the bookfirst before viewing the movie. They believe seeing the movie versionfirst "ruins" the book. This point is especially true for a literary masterpiece such as Jane Eyre. The author, Charlotte Bronte, wrote an incredible story of the orphan Jane's life in such a descriptive manner that the reader is captured and feels as if he or she is in the story with Jane as she narrates it. No movie can reproduce the literary elements and themes as well as the written word of the author herself. The reader's mind is taken on a journey as it does the work of exploring and imagining the story coming to life as the plot unfolds.Watching the movie after one has read and studied the novel does, however, help to put a "picture to word". It takes the images the reader has envisioned and turns them into 3-D as the characters "come to life" through the settings and acting.
The setting of the red room in the book, which is found in chapter two, is described thoroughly as the room itself is symbolic of death, terror and confinement. On a deeper and more personal level, it is a symbol of things Jane has to overcome to find happiness. One of the grandest bedrooms or "chambers" in the Gateshead mansion, the red room was still rarely used; Jane describes it as being cold, silent, remote and solemn, containing a huge four poster dark mahogany bed. It has deep red drapes hanging from the four massive pillars and the bed is made with crisp, white linens. She describes a beautiful, stately room with an unlit fireplace and grand furniture and mirror but to her it represents more of a tomb; the place her Uncle Reed spent his last days and died.The settings are very similar between the book and the movie with a few differences bei

Slowing Down the Aging Process essays

Humanity has come a long way as we evolve and adapt to our changing world. Through the years, we have managed to overcome several limitations, which in the past were nothing more than dreams. We succeeded in landing on the moon and communicating over long distance, yet there are still some boundaries we have yet to cross despite our best effort. Aging is an inevitable process of nature. While we cannot stop the ticking clock in our body, we have made it possible for aging to be delayed and relieved to a great extent through advance technology and modern governance. High-tech equipment and medications are available for the treatments of more illnesses as our understanding of medicine improves and governments nowadays are doing more for the elderly population in their society. 
With more emphasis placed on healthcare by governments today and the advancement of our medical technology, people get to live longer. Cancers are not as deadly as in the past and new vaccines are constantly being developed. People, including the elderly, are made less vulnerable to the incapacitation of diseases, and in a way, we become biologically stronger. This also means an increase in the productivity of the aged, physically. McClatchy Newspapers (2008, October 20) suggested that with the miracle of modern medicine, 60 might be the new 40. However, most treatments do not come cheap and chronic illnesses, especially, take a toll on their finances as people live longer. “One hospitalisation, for example, a stroke can set you back at tens of thousands of dollars," as stated by Associate Professor Paulin Straughan, sociologist, National University of Singapore in Channel NewsAsia (2009, August 19). In fact, most elderly are not rich and many cannot afford the treatments. Friedland and Summer highlighted that some segments of the aged population might be overlooked and remain very vulnerable. For this group of people, most governments intervene to help t…

Slowing Down the Aging Process essays

Humanity has come a long way as we evolve and adapt to our changing world. Through the years, we have managed to overcome several limitations, which in the past were nothing more than dreams. We succeeded in landing on the moon and communicating over long distance, yet there are still some boundaries we have yet to cross despite our best effort. Aging is an inevitable process of nature. While we cannot stop the ticking clock in our body, we have made it possible for aging to be delayed and relieved to a great extent through advance technology and modern governance. High-tech equipment and medications are available for the treatments of more illnesses as our understanding of medicine improves and governments nowadays are doing more for the elderly population in their society. 
With more emphasis placed on healthcare by governments today and the advancement of our medical technology, people get to live longer. Cancers are not as deadly as in the past and new vaccines are constantly being developed. People, including the elderly, are made less vulnerable to the incapacitation of diseases, and in a way, we become biologically stronger. This also means an increase in the productivity of the aged, physically. McClatchy Newspapers (2008, October 20) suggested that with the miracle of modern medicine, 60 might be the new 40. However, most treatments do not come cheap and chronic illnesses, especially, take a toll on their finances as people live longer. “One hospitalisation, for example, a stroke can set you back at tens of thousands of dollars," as stated by Associate Professor Paulin Straughan, sociologist, National University of Singapore in Channel NewsAsia (2009, August 19). In fact, most elderly are not rich and many cannot afford the treatments. Friedland and Summer highlighted that some segments of the aged population might be overlooked and remain very vulnerable. For this group of people, most governments intervene to help t…